Hemant prepares food everyday on his own.

A Man Who Didn’t Have Money to Feed His Daughter Once, Feeds Hundreds at Government Hospitals Now

Hemant Patel has personally witnessed what hunger can do to people — not once but twice. The first time was when his own daughter was sick and he had no money to feed her. And the second time was after the 2002 riots in Gujarat when he saw hundreds of people sitting outside a hospital with no food. In the 13 years since then, Hemant has been going regularly to government hospitals and slums to provide meals to the poor. This is his story.
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Meet Mahendra Shrimali, The Man Who Set up India’s First Shelter for Dogs with Disabilities

The 64-year-old, a former senior officer at the State Bank of India, talks about his disabled and wounded dogs like a father about his children—with the same love, affection, warmth, and tenderness. In taking care of them, Mahendra Shrimali says, “I feel that I have finally found my purpose as a human being; I have found the thing I was always supposed to do.”
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She Helps the Needy Get Access to Wheelchairs, Crutches, Etc. For Just Re. 1

Orthopaedic equipment is expensive — wheelchairs cost thousands and even lakhs of rupees, while even a simple pair of crutches can tot up to a few hundred. But more important is the fact that most of the time, this equipment has a short-term use. Falguni Doshi of Vadodara has come up with an innovative way of recycling the equipment while helping the needy.
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20 Unknown Government School Teachers who are Totally Nailing their Jobs

Can a teacher who uses the "Kaun Banega Crorepati" format in his lesson plans inculcate a spirit of enquiry among his students? Can another who encourages kids to write letters to the Chief Minister, provide them with a sense of civic responsibility? And can a third who uses children as "street monitors" to bring other kids to school, improve attendance? The answer is yes. These government school teachers in small mofussil towns and villages of India are showing how one person can bring change in the lives of hundreds.
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The young lawyer from Mumbai who revived a highway restaurant run by tribal women in Gujarat

Giving up a fledgling career in Corporate Law, Sunayana K moved to a remote Gujarati village to work with a SHG. Here she helped the 18 women rejuvenate their failing restaurant business with innovative meal plans and recipes. She now hopes to use her experience and legal training to study issues faced by migrants and thus push for better and more inclusive policies for the rural poor.
Munira Nagji

She travels from Canada to a village in India to impart Montessori education to underprivileged kids

With the positive effects of Montessori on children being realised, more and more parents have started believing in the importance of sending their child to gain such an experience. Even so, the spread of this knowledge is scarce, especially in the rural and backward urban areas of India. One woman has taken it upon herself to change the course of this tide.