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TBI Blogs: 5 Important Lessons of Life That Travelling Through India’s Villages Can Teach You

70 % of India’s population still lives in rural villages. However, for all the amenities provided by urbanisation and modernisation, rural India can still teach urban India a thing or two about how to live a good life.

Take a deep breath. Inhale! Just allow yourself to get lost in the power of anonymity, as you travel in India’s rustic and raw villages. Often, we are so agonized by our sense of identity and lack of utter self-awareness in the humdrum of city life that the noise of the city pulls us in, sucking our breath. So, what can free us, you might ask?

Well, definitely some contemplation in the rural outskirts of India.

Your worth is a comparative idea

Defining our sense of worth can be a difficult process, often a treacherous one. We constantly, subconsciously, keep comparing ourselves with others—people with better careers, family life, money, and acknowledgment. In this rapidly changing world of social media, it becomes a necessity to constantly fabricate our lives in order to get approval. But imagine. In the villages of India, there are so many men, women, and children who do not have access to that technology. Instead, they find their happiness in community rituals, laughing out during evening tea, or just singing folklore songs. If they can be content, so can you, right?

The facade of modernization

As urbanization marks its advent, it has become irresistible to camouflage how we look, how our homes appear, how we purchase, or even communicate. It needs to be modern, fast, and yes, expensive. But look at the villagers, soaked in sweat and tiredness after a busy day at work, who have nothing of it. There’s no fabrication at all. Somehow, the innocence in their language and outlook at life is still preserved, not corrupted by any alien product. That alone does set them free!

The warmth of hospitality

No matter how small, fragile, or rustic their home is, villagers will always welcome you, making you drool for their exotic delicacies. Warmth like this is definitely a nudity of soul which cannot be experienced, owned, or shared through monetary exchange. In fact, by staying in rural India, you also learn how difficult it is to bid adieu, no matter how different the culture where you come from is. Their hospitality will touch your heart, and their kindness will touch your soul, even if you don’t understand their local language. That, of course, is magical in itself.

Less is More

Though rural outskirts might not have the most tantalizing architecture, equipment, or techniques, they do have a very strong cultural practice, stemming from generation after generation, because they know how to create, preserve, and continue following the rules of nature, an association which is very close-knit. No complication, no hustle-bustle. Life in a village continues and ends every day in a rhythmic manner, which is definitely an inspiration in itself.

Intrinsic healing

The very idea of healing has become a medical concept. With the sudden mushrooming of old-age homes and medical centres, we have somehow lost the essence of how to treat an elderly person in their own home with grace. Medical care is expensive in the rural heartland. But, it does not mean that healing does not take place here. Plenty of research has suggested that the old and elderly have higher longevity if they live, breathe, and survive in their own homes.

Thus, for each one of us, how an Indian village speaks to us will be a completely different and personal experience. But what matters, more than anything, is that all of it will surely touch your heart and leave an indelible mark.

Explore the various rural tourism options offered by Grassroutes Journeys on their website.

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Grassroutes Journeys provides off-grid, rustic, and authentic holidays with rural people and tribes, so that people from across the world can experience Indian villages in their most authentic forms.