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Govt’s New Plan to Check Car Theft: Microdots That Make Hiding Your Car Impossible

Did you know last year about 41,000 vehicles were stolen in Delhi while the rate of recovery was only 30 cars per month?

Planning to buy a car soon, but worried about it getting stolen, and being unable to retrieve it?

Those days may soon come to an end. In a significant move, the government will ask automakers to adopt the MicroDot technology, which involves “spraying thousands of the small dots laser etched with a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), throughout the vehicle.”

This technology, experts argue, will significantly enhance the chances of recovering a stolen vehicle.

As per this Times of India report today, in a month or two, the Centre will issue an official notification directing automakers to adopt this technology.

Since it is impossible to erase these dots, it becomes possible to identify a car or its stolen parts at any stage. This anti-car theft technology has been adopted with some success in South Africa, and the government consulted various field experts to assess whether they also wanted to do the same.

For representational purposes only. (Source: Flickr/repairs)
For representational purposes only. (Source: Flickr/repairs)

The CMVR-TSC, the government’s premier technical standard setting agency, will finalise the guidelines on how automakers in India should adopt this technology in a month or two. It has already come up with a draft version of the guidelines.

While setting guidelines, the road ministry has asked experts to consult with the Delhi Police on car theft. Why is that?

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Well, among the 2.14 lakh vehicles stolen across India in 2016, Delhi topped the list with 38,664, which amounts to nearly 100 vehicles a day. Following Delhi, you have Uttar Pradesh (34,480) and Maharashtra (22,435). Last year was even worse for Delhi with 41,000 vehicles stolen. However, the police could only recover approximately 30 cars a month.

It is well understood that car thieves take out the engines, among other valuable parts, before destroying any trace of the vehicle.

“Since the vehicle identification number or chassis number is inscribed on almost all parts of the body, it becomes impossible to change the identity of the stolen vehicles. Hence, the chances of recovery increase manifold,” one CMVR-TSC member told the Times of India.

For representational purposes only. (Source: Pixabay)
For representational purposes only. (Source: Pixabay)

However, the Centre does not want to impose this new anti-car theft technology on carmakers and said, “once the technology stabilises and there is greater demand, the industry would adopt this as a norm.”

Also Read: Scrap Your Old Car & Get Upto Rs 2.5 Lakh Off On Your New Electric Car!

Meanwhile, the transport ministry will also consult automakers on the draft version of the guidelines that will soon be seen on its official website.

(Edited by Gayatri Mishra)

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