Upcycled Incense to Hanging Lamps: This Ganesh Chaturthi, Go Green with the Decor

Upcycled Incense to Hanging Lamps: This Ganesh Chaturthi, Go Green with the Decor

This #GaneshChaturthi, celebrate in style with these simple ideas that are in sync with nature, big on sustainability and sure to make your decoration stand out! #LiveGreen #Lifestyle

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The fairy light strings in our house come out of the cabinet only twice a year – once during the Ganesh Chaturthi and then during Diwali. Now, this seems to be the case with most of us, and it surely must get dull with every passing year.


Why celebrate with PoP or chemical paint? Get home an eco-friendly Ganesha idol instead. Click here to bring one to your home today!


We present to you amazing and unique ideas that will help your Ganesha decorations stand out from the rest.

The best part? They are as sustainable as they are aesthetic. So you won’t be adding any more plastic to the environment, but celebrating the traditional way.

Hanging lamps

Did you know, the lights are never supposed to go out during the entire 10-day festival? Naturally, this means light strings have become our go-to solution for decorations.

This year, however, you can go classy with a hanging lamp to light up your decorations. We have a wide variety of beautiful lamps that will add to the aesthetics of your decorations.

Choose wisely, and you can also have lamps that cast lovely shadows on the walls.

Plant holders for Ganesha

Source: TBI.

What can be better than a natural decoration for Ganesha? Upcycle plastic bottles, reposition your garden pots or buy new ones for the festival and plant a gorgeous decoration, one that will stay with you even after the celebrations are over.

You can choose to arrange the pots on the floor or the table.

But don’t stop at that. Add more greens to the decoration by suspending flowering plants from the ceiling.

Purchase plant holders and your work is done!

Make sure that all the details match the decorations!

Representative images. Source: Good Free Photos.

If you have taken the fantastic decision of celebrating an eco-festival, don’t forget the offerings, flowers and pooja materials.

Take incense sticks, for example. This year, why not go for sticks that are made of upcycled flowers?

(In fact, you can upcycle flowers into lip balms, perfume and more by yourself as well. Find out how here.)

But that’s not all. The water that you use for prayers can give your plants an additional blessing as well – just nourish them with it.

And the fruits can either be given to birds or composted to help your garden bloom!

Reuse and reduce

Source: TBI.

Did you buy a thermocol decoration in a moment of haste and are regretting it now? It’s alright.

Since thermocol is an eco-harming material, don’t throw it away. Rather you can reuse it many times over so you reduce your carbon footprint each passing year.

Get creative with the decorations otherwise, so the same old thermocol temple gets a unique look each time.

For example, a jungle-themed decoration can have stands and hanging showpieces with animals and birds.

If you are nurturing a garden, the flowers and fallen leaves from it can be utilised for decoration. Restrict yourself to only the flowers available in your garden and resist the temptation to buy them.

Rummage through your cupboards to get clothes that you don’t use anymore. Whether it is a silk kurta or a georgette saree or a shimmering dupatta, your unused clothes can turn into a beautiful pandal for the Ganesha idol.

Upcycled table runners are also good additions for decorations on auspicious occasions.

Don’t forget the diyas!

No festival is complete without lighting diyas. And this time around, light a diya that will also empower rural artisans! Make sure that the diyas are lit with organic oil only.

Add a dollop of ghee to make your celebrations eco-friendlier. Place the diya along with the Prashad in this copper thali to complete the rituals.

(Edited by Vinayak Hegde)

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