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Inspiring! Thane Boy Fights Autism, Secures 99.97% in the CAT Exam

We are celebrating his success because he achieved it after numerous struggles since his early years. When he was in school, he was diagnosed with dyslexia, which brought its own share of troubles.

‘Where there is a will, there is a way.’

26-year-old Mihir Kapse reminds me of this classic saying.

In the CAT 2018 results announced on January 5, 2019, he secured a score of 206, placing him in the 99.97 percentile bracket.

We are celebrating his success because he achieved it after numerous struggles since his early years. When he was in school, he was diagnosed with dyslexia, which brought its own share of troubles.

However, it was found only much later that he was actually suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder and not dyslexia.

Mihir Kapse
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A study undertaken by Spectrum News shows that one in 100 children in India under age ten has autism, and nearly one in eight has at least one neurodevelopmental condition. These estimates are based on the first rigorous study of its kind in the country.

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Jhanvi Kapse, Mihir’s mother, in a report published by MyMedicalMantra, says, “All this has come after many hardships. We were not only fighting with his disorder but with the outside world as well, where children like him are not easily accepted.”

An engineer, Mihir has been working as a quality analyst with JP Morgan. Despite trouble coping in school and battling to find acceptance, he has managed to ace the examinations and prove that the only thing that matters ultimately is hard work.

Speaking to the publication, Dr Harish Shetty, Psychiatrist at Dr LH Hiranandani Hospital, Mumbai, says, “[A] Child suffering from autism is still denied admission at normal schools. Among the different strata of our society, the lower socio-economic group child is still ignored. So, we still have a long way to achieve development in this sector.”

Here are some things that will help people suffering from autism spectrum disorder:

1. All stakeholders must be made aware of the disorders.
2. Teachers must be trained to handle such children.
3. Schools and workplaces must be made more inclusive.
4. Pre-vocational and vocational training must also be strengthened.

With people like Mihir achieving success on such a large platform, we hope that many others find his story inspiring and follow suit.

(Edited by Shruti Singhal)

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