in , , ,

Gurugram Teens Build Robot That Could Solve India’s Waste Problem, Win Global Prize!

“Most of the times children are either new to the field of robotics or are in the process of learning about it. Time is limited, so we have to simultaneously work on all aspects, which includes research and development, programming, building, construction and mechanics.”


#ChildrenForThePlanet: This Children’s Day, TBI will be celebrating young innovators who are taking steps big and small for a sustainable future.


13th World Robotic Olympiad (WRO) was held in India for the first time in 2016. With over 2,000 students participating from over 54 countries, the WRO was certainly a huge success. It is an event which brings together young people interested in science, technology and education from across the world.

The theme in 2016 was ‘Rap the Scrap’, keeping in mind the government’s Swachh Bharat Mission.

High Voltage – the winning team

In an exclusive conversation with The Better India, Varun Mayanger, the coach at the RoBoGenius Academy in Gurugram, who mentored the team that won the second prize in the Junior High category. The team comprised Jainil Ajmera, Prakhar Mittal and Abhimanyu Deb Singh, who completed their task in the fastest time and had the highest score.

What did they build?

Varun says, “Most of the times children are either new to the field of robotics or are in the process of learning about it. Time is limited, so we have to simultaneously work on all aspects, which includes research and development, programming, building, construction and mechanics. The team has to ensure that the robot is assembled with precision. And as per the norms of the challenge, it should perform with accuracy on the day of the competition within the stipulated time of two minutes.”


Attention young innovators! India’s biggest youth innovation challenge is here. Atal Innovation Mission, NITI Aayog & The Better India present Innovation Marathon 2018 — a nation-wide challenge open to those under the age of 18 with innovations that can solve some of India’s most pressing issues. The top 30 innovations will win a chance to attend a Student Innovator Program other than getting cash prizes, mentorship and opportunities to develop their prototypes further.

Have an innovation?

Unable to view the above button? Click here


The robot built by the team identified and segregated different kinds of waste and transferred it into the garbage bin, making recycling much easier.

Making India proud.

“Instead of going in for a complicated design, we opted for a simple and compact design,” says Varun.

The robot had to solve a pre-defined challenge, which involved sensing and picking up colourful blocks, denoting different kinds of biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste, and then dropping these in a bin with the matching colour. The participating robots needed to sense the colour and the location of the bins, which would keep on changing.

Varun goes to say that all the three boys were aware of their strengths and limitations. They also demonstrated immense discipline and respect at all times.

The team members

Speaking about the boys individually, Varun says, “Prakhar and Janil were very good with programming, while Abhimanyu proved himself in building, construction and mechanics. Together, they worked as a good cohesive team.”

Giving the boys all the credit for their success, Varun says, “I will be very honest, I did not have to work a lot with the three students, I merely had to give them a little guidance from time to time.”

The boys with their coach – Varun

Dedication

Narrating an incident that moved Varun, he says, “When the team was formed, I was in the USA for the First Tech Challenge. When I returned, I was surprised to see that they had already prepared the rough prototype of the robot. Usually, the team waits for the coach to start. With them, it was the opposite. I was impressed; the robot just needed a few changes here and there. Their drive, passion, talent and dedication really touched me.”

Abhimanyu speaks

Now in grade 12 at Pathways School in Gurugram, Abhimanyu says that he began experimenting with robotics rather early, but it was when he moved to Pathways that his interest was strengthened.

Speaking about the device that the team built, he says, “Each year, the theme of the competition is changed. The entire competition is to see how well we know our concepts and how we are able to put that theoretical knowledge into practice.”

While the device that High Voltage built can be made into a full-fledged product, it will have to be made with other materials.

Russia, India, and China.

The idea can be replicated but making it with Lego is not something that he sees happening.

“We stood second globally, with Russia bagging the first place and China, the third. We got certificates and medals and a trophy for the team, but just the accolades that have come with it have been awesome,” said Abhimanyu.

Robotics–the future?

Stem and Robotics is the need of the hour for today’s students, as most jobs in the future will be done by robots. Varun believes that robotics is the easiest and fun way of teaching the concepts of science and math as everything in robotics is hands-on.

It also enhances logical and analytical reasoning and helps you to understand the mechanics. Moreover, kids learn the importance of teamwork when they participate in competitions like WRO and First Lego League.

Proud team from India.

Another important reason why Varun thinks kids must opt to dabble in robotics is that it has the potential to change the world. Many of the problems we face today can be eradicated with the help of robotic technology.


Attention young innovators! India’s biggest youth innovation challenge is here. Atal Innovation Mission, NITI Aayog & The Better India present Innovation Marathon 2018 — a nation-wide challenge open to those under the age of 18 with innovations that can solve some of India’s most pressing issues. The top 30 innovations will win a chance to attend a Student Innovator Program other than getting cash prizes, mentorship and opportunities to develop their prototypes further.

Have an innovation?

Unable to view the above button? Click here


Here’s to children taking charge of the present to build a better future.

(Edited by Shruti Singhal)

Like this story? Or have something to share?
Write to us: contact@thebetterindia.com
Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.