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The Road Ahead: What This Daman IAS Officer Did is What Kerala Needs Right Now

Now that the state begins to rebuild itself, we need to shift our focus. But how? What does Kerala need next?

After a week-long downpour, the rains are finally halting their tyranny in Kerala. While on the one hand, the receding floodwaters have brought relief, it is essential to note that they are also potentially a gateway to serious health hazards.

While Kerala was struggling against with rising water levels, we helped them by sending supplies such as dry food, clothes and blankets to relief camps.

Now that the state begins to rebuild itself, we need to shift our focus. But how? What does Kerala need next?

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The answer may perhaps lie in Daman’s contribution to the ongoing relief effort in the rain-ravaged state. Thanks to the efforts of IAS officer Sajjan Singh (Advisor to Administrator, Daman), the union territory sent a truck full of 60 essential medicines to Kerala.

Struggling to restart their normal lives after the devastation left by the massive flooding, the residents of Kerala are also facing severe health risks. Dengue, diarrhoea, typhoid, and leptospirosis are just some diseases that might break out in the state once the flood water settles back in.

Thus, taking steps to curb spread of diseases and replenishing stocks of essential medicines becomes a step of utmost importance. As such, people and NGOs aiding relief efforts could do well to borrow a leaf from IAS officer Sajjan Singh’s book.

Those who want to contribute can donate medicines, ORS packets, and first aid materials to Kerala but ensure that the bill is included along with them. This allows volunteers to distribute medicines according to demand as also gives them a confirmed date of purchase.

Also, please make sure that the medicines are packed in bulk, rather than sending out a small batch of different medicines. Kerala also needs doctors and nurses out in the field, a requirement that has already been flagged by the state government.

However, controlling disease outbreaks is just one of the many challenges that the state will need to overcome as it limps back to normalcy.


GiveIndia and The Better India have come together to help Rebuild Kerala by supporting 41,000 affected families. You too can be a part of this movement and help us raise funds for the NGOs working to rehabilitate these families. If all of us come together with a small monthly contribution, we can make a real and meaningful difference in helping restore normalcy to those who need our help the most.

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Here are 9 other things Kerala will need on its road to recovery.

1. Water purifiers:

Source: Twitter/ Mohan Ranbaore.

Clean water for domestic use is the need of the hour in Kerala, and unfortunately, the state is facing a scarcity of the same. Chlorine tablets can be your best friend in this situation. Make sure that you sanitise utensils with chlorine thoroughly before use.

Put a chlorine tablet in a bucket of water and let it do its job for about half an hour before using the water for domestic purposes. Also, chlorinate drinking water sources. But make sure you don’t drink water before boiling it.

2. Water Absorption:


Thousands of Kerala people will return to their previously submerged homes only to realise that water has reached everywhere—utensils, furniture, cupboards and bedding etc. The sun is still not shining with all glory in Kerala and in any case, just keeping items under sunlight might not be the most efficient option.

Here, Sodium Polyacrylate will be your perfect solution. With the capacity to absorb water up to as much as 100% of its body mass, this “waterlock” is used everywhere—from sanitary napkins to anti-flood bags—where absorption is the primary purpose.

3. Discard stored food:

Source: Twitter/Indian Air Force.

Food, whether canned or tinned, will pose a serious health hazard if your house was under water. Floodwater carries bacteria that can enter even airtight containers. So, throw out all the stored food—even if it was expensive—because nothing is more costly than your health.

Make sure you clean every utensil/container with chlorine or bleaching powder before food makes contact with it again. Do not keep food in the open for a few days, let the situation returns to normal.

4. Bedding and clothing:

Source: Twitter/ Western Railway.

This will require special attention. Water, germs and even insects could enter anything made of cloth and stay there without your notice. Clothes can be washed, cleaned, dried or drycleaned before use. But bedding and other stuffed things will need to be thrown out. Local authorities, according to Matrubhumi, will help you with this task.


You may also like: How Did the Rains Fall over Kerala? Watch This NASA Video to Find Out


5. Plumbers, electricians, painters and other labour:

Representative image. Source: Twitter/ BCP MAN.

For the next few weeks, perhaps months, Kerala will be rebuilding itself on a micro scale. Houses, schools, colleges and other buildings will need to be disinfected, their electrical sockets will need to be fixed and plumbing corrected. People whose homes were submerged in water will now need such labourers, and if they get this help for free, they will save a lot of money.

If you are proficient in such work or can fund this, you can contact local IAS officers, and offer your services. In fact, Uniservice, a facility management company in Bengaluru, has sent a team of 20 technicians(including electricians and plumbers) on a mission to light up 500 houses in the flood-affected regions like Thrissur and Aluva. Hearteningly, the team has already restored power in 300 houses.

6. Personal hygiene:


If the drainage pipes near your home are broken, please refrain from using taps, showers or even toilets. The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) issues guidelines on the same. Do not wander in areas that are still submerged. Make sure you seal every water leak in your house. Use mosquito nets and mosquito repellent creams (note, use both not either) to prevent malaria, dengue etc. If you have pets, disinfect them and take them to a vet for a medical checkup.

7. House inspection:

Source: Twitter/ H υ ɴ τ ᴇ ʀ ツ.

Visit your home during daytime (do this before you plan to shift) and do a thorough check-up of your home. Look out for loose, live wires, water leakages, broken walls/windows and pests. It would be best if you could take an expert with you. Rotten food, growing fungi and bacteria might pose a danger for you. Use protective gear like gumboots, hat, gloves and a wet cloth over your mouth to ensure safety.

8. Kitchen kits

Sources: (L) Twitter. (R) Twitter.

Dry utensils, fresh food and purifying agents will be urgently required. If you wish to donate supplies but think it’s too late, here is your opportunity. Kitchen kits consisting of these supplies could help the flood-affected people. However, please make sure you don’t send in foodstuff like chips or instant noodles anymore. It is time to change the relief supplies we are sending in, according to the dynamics of the situation.


You may also like: Kodagu: Cooking Dawn to Dusk, Elderly Couple & Son Feed 1000 Flood Victims Daily!


9. Damaged documents:

Sources: (L) Twitter. (R) Twitter.

Crucial documents like Voter ID cards, land deeds, ration cards, Aadhaar cards, RC books, licenses and even textbooks might be lost or damaged in these devastating floods. But don’t worry too much about this. The Kerala Government has made provisions to replace these documents if need be. Follow the link here to know the details.

You might even have to file for insurance. Here is a TBI article that guides you on how to claim home insurance, life insurance or motor insurance.


GiveIndia and The Better India have come together to help Rebuild Kerala by supporting 41,000 affected families. You too can be a part of this movement and help us raise funds for the NGOs working to rehabilitate these families. If all of us come together with a small monthly contribution, we can make a real and meaningful difference in helping restore normalcy to those who need our help the most.

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(Edited by Gayatri Mishra)

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