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These 40 Families Left Hyderabad and Built a Sustainable Village All by Themselves

Moving to outskirts of the city four years ago, they adopted a self-sustaining model under which they started living in eco-friendly homes made of recycled bamboo and grew their own food.

Would you toss away your comfortable city life filled with technology to be closer to nature?

Away from the technological entrapments of concrete jungles, where one can be unruffled by polluted air or pesticides in what one eats – imagine a life like that.

Though many would call it ‘The Dream’, a group of 40 families from Hyderabad chose to make that dream their reality.

Moving to outskirts of the city four years ago, they adopted a self-sustaining model under which they started living in eco-friendly homes made of recycled bamboo and grew their own food.

Calling themselves, Ru-Urban, the community-based in Aziz Nagar, consists of 70 members whose lives encompass the best of both worlds.

For representational purposes. Source: Public Domain Pictures.

“It was a coming together of like-minded people who cared for nature that led to the creation of this commune,” Rajendra Kumar G, one of the founders, told the Times of India.

While most of the members come from an architectural background, Rajendra explained that they were driven by the idea of preserving nature along with a sustainable lifestyle – which lead these families to the concept.

“We realised that producing our own food was the key to accomplish this mission. So four years ago, we started this collective farming initiative. Today, we make our own food, energy and have even adopted four small hamlets near our farm. Our urban farm also provides employment to 400-odd villagers,” he added.


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Apart from cultivating their own food, the Ru-Urban community produces its own supply of energy through solar panels fitted on rooftops of all homes. Producing about 0.8 megawatts of energy every hour, the community finds its energy needs met sufficiently.

As a step towards producing unadulterated food, the community members rear native breeds of cattle.

“We now have about 45 cows and over 30 goats. Also, we have a lot of chicken and ducks, all rescued from slaughterhouses. Here they help create an invaluable ecosystem and rejuvenate the soil of this land that was lying barren for decades,” Rajendra added.

Featured image inset source: Times of India.

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Written by Lekshmi Priya S

Shuttling between existentialist views and Grey's Anatomy, Lekshmi has an insanely disturbing habit of binge reading. An ardent lover of animals and plants, she also specializes in cracking terribly sad jokes.