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Want to Help an Injured Stray? These 5 Organisations Can Guide You.

Many organisations in the country have been relentlessly working towards providing onsite treatment for injuries as well as maggot infections.

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We often come across stray animals on streets that are hurt or have wounds infested with maggots.

While empathy towards street animals is a virtue that is rare and appreciable, it is important to know that sometimes our intervention can cause harm.

Source: Pixabay.

Many organisations in the country have been relentlessly working towards providing onsite treatments for accident injuries as well as maggot infections to street animals. Here’s a list of places that you can reach out to for onsite treatments, shelters as well as medicare for our furry friends:

1. Jaagruti, New Delhi

Source: Pixabay.

Started in 2009, the aim of the organisation is to provide onsite treatment to street dogs and other animals rather than transporting the animal to a hospital, which takes time and often lacks space, resulting in secondary infections.

With the primary area of operations in the northwest region in Delhi, the team believes that most minor injuries or infections are best treated on the street where the animal is localized and is more likely to be comfortable or at ease.

You can reach out to them at contact@jaagruti.org.

To enquire about the first aid and vaccination service along with advice for street dogs in northwest Delhi, you can email firstaid@jaagruti.org.

2. Animal Warriors India, Hyderabad

Source: Pixabay.

Found in 2016, the AWI with its team of 10 volunteers is a call away for carrying out rescue operations in any part of the city. Working towards getting more people to participate in rescue and rehabilitation, the team has set up pocket shelters across the city.

This enables them to use the backyard of a building or apartment, where the pocket shelters are located and can hold the injured animal till its time of recovery.

Such a step proves crucial in situations where animals are seriously injured, making it nearly impossible for animals or rescuers to travel long distances.

You can reach out to Animal Warriors India at 9553061691 and 8977911911 or ping them on their Facebook page.

3. Animal Aid Unlimited, Udaipur

One of the rescue dogs at Animal Aid Unlimited. Source: Animal Aid Unlimited.

Based in Udaipur, the organisation has been rescuing and treating street animals that are ill or injured since 2002. But more than the process, the organisation focuses on galvanising people’s timely participation for protecting and defending animal lives.

And by animals, Animal Aid Unlimited doesn’t restrict its services to dogs, and have rescued more than 45,000 injured or ill dogs, cows, donkeys, birds and cats to date.

You can reach out to Animal Aid Unlimited at 09829843726 or 09784005989, where you can report any injured or ill street animal in Udaipur.

For other enquiries, you can write to them at erikaabrams@yahoo.com.

4. ResQ Charitable Trust, Pune

Source: ResQ Charitable Trust.

Since its inception in 2007, ResQ  has provided treatment for 40,000 animals that includes abandoned and injured street dogs, cats, cows, buffaloes, donkeys, horses, pigs and even elephants.

Attending to over 500 animals every month, the organisation comprises  a well-equipped facility with four vets, a team of around 25 team members and many volunteers. However, the best part is that they have two onsite ambulances with a vet on board and one release vehicle.


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Apart from rescuing and treating injured street animals, they also assist with the process of adoption and have a halfway home for paralysed or animals with special needs. Also, regular anti-rabies vaccination drives are conducted through ResQ, to ensure safety and reduction in the number of human deaths, paving way for changing one’s perspective towards street animals.

You can report an injured animal at their WEBLINE.

For regular queries, you can write to them at info@resqct.org.

5. The Welfare of Stray Dogs (WSD), Mumbai

Source: The Welfare of Stray Dogs.

Vehemently vouching for onsite treatment and no-kill policy, the folks at WSD believe that unless otherwise, most stray dogs are better off being treated in their own territories and can recover from an injury or ailment faster without going through the stress of hospitalization.

With an in-house first-aid team and a large number of trained volunteers, the team works in groups, reaching out to different areas of the city to treat stray dogs with wounds, skin problems and other ailments.

Apart from these activities, WSD carries out onsite sterilisation that includes vaccination for rabies for strays and conducts free workshops twice every year on basic first-aid for stray dogs for the public.

The organisation also runs a homeopathic clinic once a week where pet and stray animals are treated for a wide variety of problems, including infections, spinal injuries, growths, skin disease and aggressive behavioural issues.

You can report a hurt and injured animal at (022)64222838 or  9819100808.

You can also write to them at wsdindia@gmail.com.


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If you know any person or organisation that runs on-site treatment initiatives for stray animals in your city, do share the details with us.

Who knows, you could help save hundreds of animals.

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Written by Lekshmi Priya S

Shuttling between existentialist views and Grey's Anatomy, Lekshmi has an insanely disturbing habit of binge reading. An ardent lover of animals and plants, she also specializes in cracking terribly sad jokes.