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Snow-Capped Ladakh to Kerala’s Backwaters: An Artist’s Depiction of Diverse India

A pursuit towards documenting the diversity of India, Archana Pereira’s illustrations gives an insight on the different facets of our country.

Diversity is another word for India.

How else would you describe a country that is home to over a billion people with different ethnicity, religion and language?

One artist’s pursuit in documenting the diversity of India in terms of its architecture, festivals, lifestyle, culture and the contrasting natural landscapes gave birth to the 100-days project or #100daysofincredibleindiabyinktrails.

Archana Pereira, an architect and an alumnus of University School of Design, Mysuru, took up the challenge in April and has been posting one illustration each day that gives an insight on the different facets of India.

Artworks embellished with pen strokes and a splash of colour, some illustrate places that the Bengaluru girl has already visited, and some that she intends to.

From the blue city of Jodhpur to the backwaters of Kerala, here are some of the hand-drawn illustrations from the 100 days project, which will give you major wanderlust feels:

First in the series, Mumbai’s local train network. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Gateway of India, the indo-saracenic monument built in the year 1920. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The stunning cantilever bridge of Howrah. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Originally believed to have been run by 17 European planters, Kadar Club still maintains its old world charm with the Shikar trophies, tiger skins, bison heads and stags. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
God’s own country. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The Blue City. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The French Quarters located close to the seaside promenade, offer a glimpse of France in India. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Vishu marks the first day of the Malayalam calendar and is the new year celebrated in Kerala. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The City Palace, located in the Pink City of India, is one of the most popular tourist spots in Rajasthan. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Originally a brick fort known by the name “Badalgarh”, Shah Jahan was imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb for eight years in the octagonal tower of this fort. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Also known as the Land of High Passes, this spectacular landscape is the highest settlement in India. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The Key Monastery, located at an altitude of 4166m above sea level close to the Spiti River, is the biggest Monastery of the Spiti Valley and is a religious training centre for the Lamas. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Originally known as Qila-e-Mubarak or The Blessed Fort, it was the main residence of the Emperors of the Mughal Dynasty for nearly 200 years until 1857. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Stretching along the west coast of India in Karnataka, Gokarna was originally a Hindu pilgrimage centre and now is a popular tourist destination with its lovely rocky beaches and hills. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
Wide expanses of tea estates in the Nilgiris. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.
The trams were the first modern means of conveyance within the city, introduced in the year 1874, initially horse drawn. Courtesy: Archana Pereira.

More illustrations depicting the rest of India are to follow soon!

You can check the rest of Archana’s work on her Instagram handle. Her works are also up on Facebook that goes by the name Ink trails.

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Written by Lekshmi Priya S

Shuttling between existentialist views and Grey's Anatomy, Lekshmi has an insanely disturbing habit of binge reading. An ardent lover of animals and plants, she also specializes in cracking terribly sad jokes.